Murder Charges

Posted by on Feb 21, 2014 in Criminal Law, Society | 0 comments

A homicide charge is perhaps the most serious charge in criminal law. Depending on the circumstances, a conviction of homicide can lead all the way to the death penalty or life in prison. When someone is charged with homicide, the burden of proof is on the prosecution. Because the allegations carry such serious implications, judges and juries must be presented with strong and believable evidence from the prosecutors that the defendant is guilty of the crime. For the defendant, it is up to them and their attorneys to maintain a reasonable doubt that they are guilty of murder. That is why it is so important for someone who is being charged to have an attorney who is focused on the case and willing to use their legal skills, resources, and knowledge to their best ability to defend their client. Defendants who are unable to maintain a skilled attorney are often a poor match for a well prepared and determined state prosecutor.

Types of Murder Charges

In general terms, the definition of homicide is the unlawful taking of another person’s life. There are, however, several different types of homicide charges. These charges depend on the circumstances of the crime, and they each carry a different range of sentencing options. The following are the different types of murder charges:

  • Voluntary Manslaughter
  • Involuntary Manslaughter
  • 1st Degree Murder
  • 2nd Degree Murder
  • Criminally Negligent Homicide

When it comes to manslaughter, there is a vast difference between voluntary and involuntary charges. While voluntary charges imply that there was intent to kill or at least harm, involuntary implies that there was no intent to kill or harm a person. Drunk driving accidents that result in someone’s death are the most common types of involuntary manslaughter cases.

According to the website of the Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter, if you are being accused of homicide or manslaughter, having a dedicated criminal defense lawyer is absolutely essential in making sure your right to a fair trial is protected. There are a lot of ways a person may want to defend him or herself in court, but they only get one chance at mounting said defense. This means that it is crucial that you find someone who can help you weigh the available defenses for your specific case and choose the most fitting one.

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