Avoiding a Child Molestation Conviction

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in Criminal Law | 0 comments

Child molesters are perhaps one of the most reviled groups of people, and this is a sentiment shared by people of all persuasions, perhaps understandably. According to an article on Horst Law’s website, even the mere allegation of improper contact with a child is enough to ruin a person’s name and reputation, never mind that everyone is presumed innocent until proven guilty. The fact is, most people are paranoid about protecting children from harm, and will regard any person accused of such a crime with deep suspicion.

It is therefore no laughing matter to be accused of child molestation. A man in California suspected of molesting a 4-year-old child was shot dead by the fiancé of the child’s mother, and both the mother and fiancé are now facing murder charges. It turns out that the child had not been molested after all.

This kind of vigilante behavior is a reaction to incidents which brought about laws targeting child molesters such as Megan’s Law, named after a 7-year-old New Jersey girl named Megan Kanka who was the raped and murdered by a convicted sex offender. This law requires all convicted sexual offenders, including child molesters, to be included in a national registry. The information contained therein, which includes the name and address of the offender and updated regularly, is made available to the public so that people can find out if one is living in their neighborhood.

Inclusion in this registry effectively opens up an individual to public vilification and harassment, or worse. It is crucial that an individual falsely accused of child molestation retains effective legal representation to avoid a conviction. It is not unknown for a child to make accusations against a strict teacher, for example, or any adult against whom the child has a grudge. While it would be wrong to discount the testimony of a child, such a serious charge needs to be thoroughly investigated to confirm the facts. A good defense lawyer would make sure that all the relevant facts of the case are brought to light and contextualized to protect the rights of the client.

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Consequences of Getting Caught Shoplifting

Posted by on Oct 4, 2013 in Criminal Law | 0 comments

Shoplifting is one of the things that most people think of as a small matter, something harmless; however, it can have a lot of impact and is a common element in the criminal history of drug addicts and countless inmates. It may seem like a victimless crime, but it is still considered stealing, and stealing entails a wide range of penalties. Although most shoplifters have various reasons why they do the act, the result is always negative. Because the general public takes lightly of it, shoplifting has become the most prevalent crime in the United States.

Shoplifting is theft or stealing, and is considered a criminal offence regardless of the item that has been stolen. However, state laws may vary on how to penalize the thief; generally, shoplifting is considered a misdemeanor and charged with petty theft or larceny if the amount of the stolen goods is between $200-$500, while those that exceed $500 can be counted as a felony and be charged with grand theft or grand larceny. Things such as past history records, proper identification, cooperation during arrest, value of the stolen merchandise, and other factors can affect the penalties that will be given, as determined by police and / or the prosecutor.

Shoplifting, or stealing from stores including employee and vendor theft, can cost retailers billions of dollars every year; statistics show that every year the loss is estimated to be $20 billion dollars. Many retails stores have gone out of business because of this problem. Shoplifting is a serious crime, and it can lead to serious juvenile crimes.

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